THE AGE FACTOR IN CHANGING ATTITUDES THROUGH LITERATURE

Samuel Munda Benya Senesie

Abstract


Experimenting on the changing of attitudes through literature, the research reported in this article took cue from earlier research publications, which showed that children of ages 5 to 11 changed their negative attitudes to positive ones through their exposure to fiction stories.  This one attempted to identify age levels higher than 11 years, which might show similar responses.  Using Year II undergraduate students of literature in a test-retest quasi experiment, it was discovered that students in the age range 15 to 24 changed their attitudes in favour of the feminist arguments projected in the selected novel; he change also tended to be stable. However, the age range 25 to 34 did not; age 35+ were too few in the three classes used as samples.  It was inferred that ages 12 to 14 could also be susceptible to the attitudinal change impact of literature, but ages above 25 would need to be tested further as they were apparently resistant to the feminist argument in the literature text.


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ISSN : 2251-1547